Gareth Farr http://garethfarr.com Fri, 25 Jul 2014 04:41:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Mezzo Sarah Connolly performing Relict Furies at EIF http://garethfarr.com/mezzo-sarah-connolly-relict-furies/ http://garethfarr.com/mezzo-sarah-connolly-relict-furies/#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 22:47:24 +0000 http://garethfarr.com/?p=691 Sarah Connolly CBE, one of the foremost British mezzo sopranos, will be performing Gareth Farr’s “Relict Furies” at the Edinburgh International Festival 2014. It will be the World Premiere of “Relict Furies”, which Gareth wrote as an EIF commission for mezzo soprano and double string orchestra. Full details of the performance can be found on [...]

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Sarah Connolly Relict Furies Gareth Farr EifSarah Connolly CBE, one of the foremost British mezzo sopranos, will be performing Gareth Farr’s “Relict Furies” at the Edinburgh International Festival 2014.

It will be the World Premiere of “Relict Furies”, which Gareth wrote as an EIF commission for mezzo soprano and double string orchestra.

Full details of the performance can be found on the Edinburgh International Festival website.

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Nancy Wake: The White Mouse http://garethfarr.com/nancy-wake-white-mouse/ http://garethfarr.com/nancy-wake-white-mouse/#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 22:27:38 +0000 http://garethfarr.com/?p=688 “Nancy Wake: The White Mouse” is a 70 minute documentary-drama from the Gibson Group and features a soundtrack by Gareth Farr. It tells the thrilling true story of a NZ-born heroine who became the Gestapo’s most wanted woman in World War II. This showcase follows Nancy Wake’s life from becoming a vital link in the [...]

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“Nancy Wake: The White Mouse” is a 70 minute documentary-drama from the Gibson Group and features a soundtrack by Gareth Farr.

Nancy Wake - Gibson Group - Gareth Farr
It tells the thrilling true story of a NZ-born heroine who became the Gestapo’s most wanted woman in World War II. This showcase follows Nancy Wake’s life from becoming a vital link in the French resistance, to fleeing from Nazi spies, before returning as a highly trained special agent. She fought to win back her country, but can Nancy also save her husband’s life?

It screens on TV1 on Sunday 20th July at 8.30pm – don’t miss it!

More details about the show are on the Gibson Group website.

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Gareth’s ‘Taheke’ at Chamberfest Ottawa http://garethfarr.com/gareths-taheke-chamberfest-ottawa/ http://garethfarr.com/gareths-taheke-chamberfest-ottawa/#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 22:07:41 +0000 http://garethfarr.com/?p=677 Flutist Joanna G’froerer and harpist Michelle Gott will perform a selection of meditative contemporary works, including Gareth Farr’s Taheke, at Chamberfest Ottawa 2014. Joanna is principal flute of the National Arts Centre Orchestra and one of Canada’s best-known flutists. Full details at the Chamberfest Ottawa website.

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Gareth Farr 'Taheke' - Chamberfest Ottawa - Joanna G'froerer

Joanna G’froerer

Chamberfest Ottawa 2014

Flutist Joanna G’froerer and harpist Michelle Gott will perform a selection of meditative contemporary works, including Gareth Farr’s Taheke, at Chamberfest Ottawa 2014.

Joanna is principal flute of the National Arts Centre Orchestra and one of Canada’s best-known flutists.

Full details at the Chamberfest Ottawa website.

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Dominion Post article on Gareth http://garethfarr.com/dominion-post-article-on-gareth/ http://garethfarr.com/dominion-post-article-on-gareth/#comments Fri, 28 Mar 2014 05:03:56 +0000 http://garethfarr.com/?p=636 The Dominion Post featured a great article today on Gareth! So Farr, so good for Gareth By TOM CARDY Wellington’s Gareth Farr is not only one of New Zealand’s best-known contemporary composers, he now has a significant standing overseas. The prestigious Edinburgh International Festival this year has commissioned Farr, 46, to compose a piece to [...]

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The Dominion Post featured a great article today on Gareth!

So Farr, so good for Gareth

By TOM CARDY

Wellington’s Gareth Farr is not only one of New Zealand’s best-known contemporary composers, he now has a significant standing overseas.

The prestigious Edinburgh International Festival this year has commissioned Farr, 46, to compose a piece to be performed at the festival in August.

But ahead of that milestone, comes another: Farr’s first piano concerto. Concerto for Piano and Orchestra will be performed by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra and young Australian pianist Tony Lee in Wellington tonight.

A concerto – where one or more instruments is contrasted and blended with an orchestra – has a long tradition in classical music. But a piano concerto for Farr has been a long time coming. He first wanted to write one when he was 17.

Read the rest of the article on the Dominion Post website.


And there’s a review by John Button up now too:

Farr’s new piano concerto marvellously inventive

By JOHN BUTTON

This was a concert of real contrasts. All three of Respighi’s Roman works with Gareth Farr’s new piano concerto sandwiched in between.

And the Farr work left the famous Respighi works in the dust. Based on just one listen I have no doubt that this marvellously inventive piano concerto is bound to develop an international life all its own. Rarely have I heard a new piece in which I felt we got the absolute essence of the composer, but this was such a piece.

Farr has stated that the piano concertos of Prokofiev, Bartok, Ravel and Shostakovich were long-term favourites and each of these composers’ influences this new concerto of delights. With marvellously free piano writing surrounded by orchestral sounds that conjure up memories of Prokofiev ballets, Ravel’s L’ Enfant et les Sortileges and even the Bartok First Piano Concerto, the ear was tickled bar after bar.

But this is no mere pastiche piece; the distinctive Farr sound was always there and one could sense Farr the puppet- master hovering over the music, pulling the strings and enjoying every second. With some wonderful piano playing from Tony Lee and superbly involved orchestral support – titillating percussion sounds still resonate – this was utterly special.

Read the rest of the review on the Dominion Post website.


Plus! Here’s a bonus picture of Gareth and his parents at the concerto mentioned in the articles:

Don, Jan and Gareth at NZSO Concerto

Don, Jan and Gareth

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La Dolce Vita – NZSO http://garethfarr.com/la-dolce-vita-nzso/ http://garethfarr.com/la-dolce-vita-nzso/#comments Mon, 17 Mar 2014 02:52:37 +0000 http://garethfarr.com/?p=608 With La Dolce Vita, Music Director Pietari Inkinen and a large-scale orchestra launch the 2014 NZSO Season with a celebration of Roman exuberance and flair. Exploring passion and history through Ottorino Respighi’s three over-the-top Roman tone poems, they embark on a rich journey through the city of Rome before resting in the shade of majestic [...]

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NZSO Gareth Farr 2014 La Dolce VitaWith La Dolce Vita, Music Director Pietari Inkinen and a large-scale orchestra launch the 2014 NZSO Season with a celebration of Roman exuberance and flair.

Exploring passion and history through Ottorino Respighi’s three over-the-top Roman tone poems, they embark on a rich journey through the city of Rome before resting in the shade of majestic pine trees.

And what could better match the feisty boldness of the Italians than a new commission from firebrand composer Gareth Farr ? Full of vigorous rhythms and vivid orchestral colours, Gareths’s new Concerto for Piano and Orchestra features Tony Lee, whose performance will quicken the pulse and re-energise the spirit.

Date: Friday 28th March, 2014
Concert Duration: 1h23

RESPIGHI Feste Romane (Roman Festivals)
FARR Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (new commission)
RESPIGHI Fontane di Roma (Fountains of Rome)
RESPIGHI Pini di Roma (Pines of Rome)

PIETARI INKINEN Conductor
TONY LEE Piano

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University of Auckland’s Distinguished Alumni Award http://garethfarr.com/university-of-aucklands-distinguished-alumni-award/ http://garethfarr.com/university-of-aucklands-distinguished-alumni-award/#comments Sun, 16 Mar 2014 09:32:43 +0000 http://garethfarr.com/?p=586 On Friday night, March 14, Gareth was honoured with the University of Auckland’s Distinguished Alumni Award. He was in the stellar company of Bruce Aitken, Dr Julie Maxton, Dr ‘Ana Maui Taufe’ulungaki, Dr William Tan and Roseanne Liang – similarly awarded – and about 400 guests in the enormous marquee in Old Government House gardens. Strike’s [...]

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University Auckland Alumni Award MedalOn Friday night, March 14, Gareth was honoured with the University of Auckland’s Distinguished Alumni Award.

He was in the stellar company of Bruce Aitken, Dr Julie Maxton, Dr ‘Ana Maui Taufe’ulungaki, Dr William Tan and Roseanne Liang – similarly awarded – and about 400 guests in the enormous marquee in Old Government House gardens.

Strike’s Murray Hickman, Tim Whitta and Rachel Jefferies started proceedings with a blood-thumping, high-energy performance of Gareth’s “Volume Pig” in the gardens of Old Government House.

The food was fabulous – the speeches entertaining, touching and inspiring and the venue, amazing. And the tropical cyclone held off until this morning when it woke our hero percussively.

At Gareth’s table Don and Jan Farr, Salesi Le’ota, Strike’s Murray Hickman, Tim Whitta and Rachel Jefferies, Charmaine Ngarimu, Rima Te Wiata, and Eve de Castro Robinson enjoyed each other’s very fine company, which was occasionally enhanced by Lisa Harrow, Don McGlashan and others.

University Auckland Alumni Awards - Gareth Farr

Gareth at the University of Auckland’s Alumni Awards

University of Auckland Alumni Awards - Gareth Farr

Gareth’s table – No.3

Gareth Farr Distinguished Alumni Awards Dinner 2014 3Gareth Farr Distinguished Alumni Awards Dinner 2014 5Gareth Farr Distinguished Alumni Awards Dinner 2014

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Duck, Death and the Tulip http://garethfarr.com/duck-death-and-the-tulip/ http://garethfarr.com/duck-death-and-the-tulip/#comments Mon, 10 Mar 2014 02:55:29 +0000 http://garethfarr.com/?p=613 Duck, Death and the Tulip is an acclaimed picture book by German illustrator and writer Wolf Erlbruch, which has been adapted by Peter Wilson as a puppetry stage production for his Little Dog Barking Theatre Company. The show is directed by Nina Nawalowalo and features music by Gareth Farr. Gareth’s composition won the 2013 Chapman [...]

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Gareth Farr - Duck Death and the TulipDuck, Death and the Tulip is an acclaimed picture book by German illustrator and writer Wolf Erlbruch, which has been adapted by Peter Wilson as a puppetry stage production for his Little Dog Barking Theatre Company.

The show is directed by Nina Nawalowalo and features music by Gareth Farr.

Gareth’s composition won the 2013 Chapman Tripp Award for Outstanding Composer of Music.

Duck, Death and the Tulip is a strangely heartwarming story. A duck strikes up an unlikely friendship with Death. The superb use of masks, puppets and objects, allows the play to deal with a difficult subject in a way that is elegant, straightforward and thought provoking.

The show has been invited to be part of the 2014 Edinburgh Festival.

Duck, Death and the Tulip is now my favourite book of all time!
- Kim Hill, Radio New Zealand National

…sublime music from Gareth Farr… – Keran Brady

…it is Gareth Farr’s music that really brings the whole piece together… – John Smythe


 Review from www.theatreview.org.nz by Keran Brady

Gareth Farr - Duck Death and the Tulip
Death is something all children ask about eventually, either as an abstract idea, or because a grandparent or pet has died. Maybe it comes from questioning where their food comes from – or whether dead flowers go “to heaven” too? Even if they are spared something unexpected and tragic happening close to their lives, it may come up through listening to or watching the news.

Duck, Death and the Tulip, the picture book by German illustrator and writer Wolf Erlbruch, has been embraced the world over by parents and teachers seeking a reference tool that enables the ‘death’ conversation. It’s about nature taking its course and subscribes to no religion, apart from scoffing gently at the stories Duck has heard about hell.

Now Peter Wilson has adapted it for Little Dog Barking, the company he established in 2010 to produce work specifically aimed at Early Childhood and Lower Primary School aged groups.

Directed by Nina Nawalowalo with sublime music from Gareth Farr and performed by Wilson and Shona McNeil, using puppets exquisitely crafted to replicate the book illustrations, it is the simplest of stories on the surface.

The Duck goes about its day, discovering and eating a Snail (of which no more is heard), having a snooze, discovering a Tulip whose aroma is ecstasy-inducing … But it is a rather endearing, skull-headed little man – Death – who picks it.

Once aware of the suitcase-toting Death – now full-sized (Wilson) and with a kind face in place of the skull – Duck discovers he is like her “shadow”, always there, not as a threat but as a possibility, ready to respond if anything untoward happens.

Death presides over a cup of tea – with real cups and saucers but mimed tea and tea spoons – but resists Duck’s suggestion they visit the pond, from which a lively Goldfish leaps. Talked into it, he comes out freezing and the kindly Duck offers to warm him up (a quiet little “Death warmed up” joke there).

They sleep as a Butterfly flits above, they ascend a tree to view the Mighty River (no share float gags here, though), the seasons change, snow falls, the river flows (shimmering silk drawn from the ‘pond’), the Duck dies (in its sleep) and is laid to rest with the Tulip, floating …

The puppetry is impeccable, with Wilson and McNeil sharing so deftly you would swear there was twice the number of puppeteers. The flow of the story is gentle and intriguing, and the New Entrant audience that filled Downstage the day I saw it was utterly entranced.

Beautifully done in every respect, it is highly recommended for 4 to 8 year olds (public performance Saturday 23 March, 10am).

For anyone who sees it, the common sayings “death warmed up” and “a dead duck” will forever have a special resonance.


Review from www.theatreview.org.nz by John Smythe

This stunning piece of Children’s theatre is a beautiful and faithful adaptation of Wolf Erlbaruch’s story of Duck’s life. The telling is a combination of puppetry and acting performed by two performers. Peter Wilson is a puppeteer who also plays Death.  Shona McKee McNeil is the voice and movement of all the other puppets and Duck.

We see Duck start out on her life, meeting and befriending Death on the way, sharing a cup of tea, going swimming, climbing a tree.  The two characters discuss life and death including where we go and how.  Death picks the tulip because he loves the flower, causing its death as soon as it is tugged from the ground.  This is a metaphor for the whole play.

The performance seamlessly combines Death as a puppet, beautifully crafted by Susan Hill, with large white skull head and glittering eyes and Wilson as a ‘human’ Death who interacts and enjoys time with Duck.  The tea party is well choreographed and highlights Duck’s fears of befriending Death.  Then Duck chooses to take Death swimming which offers real humour with a fish slapping Death in the face whilst swimming by.  When Death shivers with cold the ‘gallows’ humour really comes to the fore: “You’ll catch your death” then “I’d rather you were death warmed up!”

The topic is sensitively dealt with and at the end we are sure Death is sad at Duck’s passing as he gently places her on a ‘river’ of fabric to slide to the other side – sideways along the stage.  Her lifeless body slowly disappears.  Her death, even though we knew it was coming is still a shock and brings a tear to most adults’ eyes.

Peter Wilson poignantly portrays Death as a kindly, humorous man with white hair and twinkly eyes. He offers no answers to Duck’s questions other than he is responsible for death alone, not what happens afterwards. The transitions from actor to puppet are smooth and totally believable.  The Death puppet is cute rather than scary.

Shona McKee McNeil scurries around the stage in silence operating not only the puppets but all the props and set.  She makes snow fall as Duck dies, to show the last season of her life.  Her magic is to make it all seem to happen without her.  Her skill is often to speak for Duck whilst operating another puppet or setting the tree, which she does so well.

The children in the audience are enthralled by the magical performances; the adults also. But it is Gareth Farr’s music that really brings the whole piece together.  At the start I feel the volume is a little high but this is rectified and we are able to hear Duck’s soft Scottish burr.  The music reflects the situations in the story perfectly without being mushy.

The lighting, operated by Jason Longstaff and created by Nigel Percy, is a further element in making the play work so effectively.  The sun has a lovely yellow glow, Duck’s journey is lit across two puppet stages as well as lighting only the front of the stage so the puppeteer can be hidden.

At the Question and Answer session after the show, director Nina Nawalowalo describes her love of magic and how this performance offers an opportunity to create this with both puppets and acting.  The acting is used to truly develop the relationship between Death and the Duck.  When he places the beautiful tulip on Duck’s body we know he loves her.   His final line “That’s life!” is simultaneously sad and funny.

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Masi review: “Life affirming. Maybe even life-changing” http://garethfarr.com/masi-review-life-affirming-maybe-even-life-changing/ http://garethfarr.com/masi-review-life-affirming-maybe-even-life-changing/#comments Sun, 03 Feb 2013 03:57:09 +0000 http://garethfarr.com/?p=552 Masi has been playing at the Sydney Festival, Australia. This review by Lloyd Bradford Syke appeared at Crikey.com.au on Jan 31, 2013. REVIEW: Masi (Sydney Festival) | Everest Theatre Lloyd Bradford Syke -  Jan 31, 2013 4:12PM  “Grounding and connective in a way social media and the inter web at large can and will never [...]

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Masi has been playing at the Sydney Festival, Australia. This review by Lloyd Bradford Syke appeared at Crikey.com.au on Jan 31, 2013.

REVIEW: Masi (Sydney Festival) | Everest Theatre

Lloyd Bradford Syke -  Jan 31, 2013 4:12PM

 “Grounding and connective in a way social media and the inter web at large can and will never be.” From across the Tasman, a deeply personal, multi-media story.

 Conch isn’t only a name for a large sea snail, or its shell. It’s a Kiwi theatre company, founded in Wellington, with hands across the South Pacific to Fiji. As with the shell, you can hear (and see) the sound of the ocean in it. I’m also presuming, as with the Marxist ska band of the same name, (The) Conch is a euphemistic abbreviation of consciousness.

Founded in 2002 by associate director Tom McCrory and artistic director Nina Nawalowalo, the company has experienced explosive growth and success (as far afield as London’s Barbican) — yet, aside from a previous visit in 2006 with Vula (Fijian for moon), Australia seems to be the unlucky country, inasmuch as being, seemingly, among the last to celebrate it. By rights, this should now change, dramatically, with the short Sydney Festival season of Masi just wrapped-up.

Nawalowalo directs this deeply personal, almost unbelievably true story of abiding love between Ratu Noa Nawalowalo, a Fijian high chief from Kadavu island on his way to read for his Bachelor of Laws and Mary Tancock, a British nurse on a working holiday, the daughter of Cambridge-educated schoolmasters.

When I say story, it’s not told through spoken word, but through song, dance, visual spectacle and magic. Magic? Well, yes, in the form of illusions devised and designed by Paul Kieve (known for his work on the Harry Potter films and Scorsese’s latest, Hugo, among other projects). The unusual mix of media used conjures the invisible, intangible fabric of memory with heartrending redolence. This is a brilliant sketch of history, heritage and happenstance, that also stands as an homage; a generous, posthumous gesture of respect by Nawalowalo, in honour of her parents.

It’s the ’50s. Having caught each other’s eyes somewhere in transit (whether at an airport, train or bus station is unclear and immaterial), the fated couple discover a mutual interest, in chess, and arrange to meet at a club to play. A chequerboard romance ensues. Of course, in a broader sense, Masi (which takes its name from the ancient art of Fijian cloth-making) is about love found and lost; identity; the soft-focus, perishable vagaries of memory. As such, one’s liable to be touched, not only specifically, by the gentle, forgiving tale woven before our eyes, but by our own recollections and regrets, which are inevitably bound to inform this work, so that it becomes as deeply personal for us as for its creators.

On entering the theatre, one is struck by the massive masi (or tapa, a more-or-less interchangeable descriptor, though referring to similar textiles deriving right across the Pacific islands) draped above the stage. Entirely handmade by Ro Miriama Saunayalewa Tubailagi, it’s a pageant in itself; in black and rust-brown and of exquisite design, it holds the enigmatic promise of surrendering secrets to those who know how to read it.

In the background, (what I took to be) a loop of traditional Fijian music may be heard. A light comes up, stage left, to reveal a cross-legged figure, Vakatara (Peni Jeffrey Lala), who enters into mesmeric chants that sound of the sublime. His voice, as well as those of the chorus (the Kabu ni Vanua dancers), are as good, round and full, if not moreso, as you’ll ever hear on any opera or other stage. The songs, or chants, are hymnal; a fusion of the best and most sacred traditions of church and tribe.

Nawalowalo takes the lead acting role; both a brave and appropriate decision. At a meditative, time-standing-still pace (compelling and seductive in itself), she opens an old suitcase with a reverence one would accord the holy grail. But, of course, in personal terms, this is her holy grail: the accoutrement, the emotional baggage if you will, of her parents’ legacy; a legacy, as all family legacies are, of both love and loss.

Kieve’s illusions really are magical and, by deft tricks involving screens, cloth and other objects, we’re introduced to a passing parade of protagonists and even a tree that grows, by leaps and bounds, before our very eyes. Again, this is the quality of memory and Kieve’s contributions point, not so obliquely, to the tricks it can play on us. It also gives licence to the ethereal, as when a spirit guide (Kasaya Manulevu) is suddenly realised, as if from another dimension.

Speaking of other dimensions, Ans Westra’s black-and-white photographs, projected as backdrops, lend an unmistakable post-war glamour to the lives of ordinary people, making each extraordinary. The precision of Nik Januriek’s lighting design is vital to the success of almost all the other elements, while Sue Prescott’s costumes present all the right flavours and textures.

Jana Castillo and Alexander Tarrant, as Mary and Ratu Noa Nawalowalo, are both unattainably beguiling; the Brad and Angelina of Oceania, only moreso. Semesi Rokobuludrau, who plays Ratu Noa as a boy, shows similarly bodacious promise.

Just as we are lulled into a deeply contemplative reverie, musing on our own misgivings and memories, burnished by Gareth Farr’s ravishing piano and cello soundtrack, we’re roused by the exhilarating muscularity of Maika Cobo, Dan John Fox, Paula Rokotuiveikau Nabuta, Tevita Salasalavonu, Ulaiasi Taoi and Mesake Vuniwai; collectively, Kabu ni Vanua. Passionate and percussive, these dancers are as central to the work as the impressionistic narrative, counterpointing its pensive sadness for the dear departed with a palpable sense of the of the hope and vitality that merge to become the lifeforce.

If flagging, or even if not, that force will be with you, once again, in seismic proportion, for some time after seeing this show, which is grounding and connective in a way social media and the inter web at large can and will never be. Life affirming. Maybe even life-changing. How often can you say that?

 

 

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Great review of Wakatipu http://garethfarr.com/great-review-of-wakatipu/ http://garethfarr.com/great-review-of-wakatipu/#comments Wed, 26 Sep 2012 02:24:52 +0000 http://garethfarr.com/?p=441 AllThingsStrings.com is a fabulous resource for string players, and their review of Gareth’s “Wakatipu” is fairly glowing. They say: The drama and structure of Gareth Farr’s ‘Wakatipu’ will leave audiences spellbound. ‘Wakatipu’ is a breathtaking thrill ride that uses exotic musical language to invoke all the drama of its namesake legend. You can read the [...]

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Gareth Farr- WakatipuAllThingsStrings.com is a fabulous resource for string players, and their review of Gareth’s “Wakatipu” is fairly glowing. They say:

The drama and structure of Gareth Farr’s ‘Wakatipu’ will leave audiences spellbound.

‘Wakatipu’ is a breathtaking thrill ride that uses exotic musical language to invoke all the drama of its namesake legend.

You can read the full review right here.

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Works by Farr Feature in NZ Music Awards http://garethfarr.com/works-by-farr-feature-in-nz-music-awards/ http://garethfarr.com/works-by-farr-feature-in-nz-music-awards/#comments Wed, 14 Dec 2011 00:48:52 +0000 http://garethfarr.com/?p=423                   Two works by Gareth Farr feature on two of the albums nominated for the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards ‘Best Classical’ album of 2011. He Poroporoaki (Saying Goodbye), co-written by Farr and taonga puoro player Richard Nunns, features on the New Zealand String Quartet’s album Notes [...]

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Two works by Gareth Farr feature on two of the albums nominated for the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards ‘Best Classical’ album of 2011.

He Poroporoaki (Saying Goodbye), co-written by Farr and taonga puoro player Richard Nunns, features on the New Zealand String Quartet’s album Notes from a Journey, a diverse and fascinating collection of works for string quartet by New Zealand composers, released by Atoll Records. Farr and Nunns co-wrote this work for the 2008 Dawn Service Commemoration at Gallipoli, Turkey. This work features alongside works by John Psathas, Micheal Norris, Jack Body and Ross Harris.

Farr’s work Taheke also features on flautist Bridget Douglas and harpist Carolyn Mills’ debut album Flight, which showcases modern works for flute and harp. Taheke is the Maori word for waterfall and each movement of the work draws inspiration from a renowned New Zealand waterfall. The recording also includes works by New Zealanders Eve de Castro-Robinson and Jack Body, as well as works by Toru Takemitsu and Tan Dun.

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